Giving Speaks Consultation

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Giving Speaks offers consultation and services customized to suit your organization’s unique mission, goals, priorities and needs.

If your organization has not recently clarified its strategic vision and/or mission, priorities, short- and long-term goals, you may benefit from having an assessment process conducted. This type of in-depth review of the organization and its funding programs is often a good place to start.

The charitable giving and fundraising landscapes are changing!

  • With the changes in the economy that are affecting charitable giving, it is more important than ever for organization leaders to follow best practices in their stewardship and know the most current strategies for effective fundraising programs.
  • Fundraising has changed dramatically in recent years with the increasing availability and social-networking and online media. Organization leaders must gain familiarity and comfort with these new fundraising opportunities.
  • Donors are more sophisticated and selective than ever before.  It is essential that you know how to relate to your donors effectively to maximize giving to your organization.

So, what does Giving Speaks have to offer you and your organization?

  • Assessments of fund development programs and stewardship practices
  • Strategic visioning and mission clarification processes
  • Planning for short-term, mid-range, or long-range goals
  • Coaching for professional and board leadership
  • Training for stewardship and fundraising volunteers
  • Campaign planning
  • Preaching, worship planning, faith development, and workshop presentations

Workshops can be conducted as webinars for your congregation or organization using Skype, Google Hangouts, Go To Meeting, or Zoom.  This is an affordable and easily accessible means of providing your staff and volunteers with focused training in these vital areas of organizational health and well-being without the added costs.

Contact Laurel Amabile, Giving Speaks, for more information:

I look forward to hearing from you!  

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Ways to communicate with Laurel and for more information about Giving Speaks Resources and services:

Email: givingspeaks@gmail.com                                                               Linked In:  Laurel Amabile, CFRE                                                                 Twitter:  Giving Speaks                                                                             Facebook page: Giving Speaks                                                                 Laurel’s Facebook: Laurel Amabile

 

Optimal Funding Outcomes: Are you REALLY making your case?

Interconnectedness What do we offer givers?

This is the central question around which your case for funding support is crafted, for it is the giver who is central to optimal funding outcomes. We must appeal to the interest of the givers as much as we promote the interests and funding needs of the organization.

Check out the new planning worksheet to help you craft your organization’s compelling case for funding support:  http://wp.me/P1xUUk-29e 

If you would like some advice and facilitation in the crafting of your case, let me know. Giving Speaks Consulting and I are here to help!

Laurel 2012

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Content Sources:

Association of Fundraising Professionals website: http://www.afpnet.org/

Fundraising Communications 101: Your Case for Support, a Campbell & Company webinar, presented by Andy Brommel and Kate Roosevelt.

There’s No Better Time for Good Stewardship

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There are times in the life a congregation when giving and cash flow takes a dip. When this happens, leaders get alarmed, panic sets in, and the wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth begins. The temptation is to take quick action to alert the congregants about “the budget crisis” and urge everyone to give more money immediately to mitigate the distressing circumstances. If that doesn’t work, the budget slashing begins. The leaders’ impulse, of course, springs from their dedication to the congregation and a strong sense of duty to maintain its financial health and well-being.

I have observed this pattern many times….

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Resist those reactive impulses. Slow down. Gather more information about the circumstances affecting the congregation’s bottom line. Take a more strategic and thoughtful approach.

In his latest book, The Church Money Manual, church consultant and author of several excellent books on stewardship, J. Clif Christopher provides guidance to clergy and lay leaders, based on years of experience and insight.

Here are the highlights of Christopher’s wise advice:

  • Gather membership, attendance and giving data from several years back to the present so that you have a better view of the facts.
  • Notice any fluctuations in the giving patterns, exploring any circumstances that may explain the rises or dips. Were there fewer Sundays this year in September than last year?  Did storms force a closing or lower attendance last winter? Were there special events two years ago that drew more families?
  • Attend to relationships, noticing if you have not been seeing some of your loyal attendees or highest contributing members. Rather than speculate on the reasons why, make contact with these folks and find out what is going on for them.  Are there hurt feelings, misunderstandings, or pastoral needs? Ask for their honest feedback, and listen with care.
  • Clarify the congregation’s mission, purposes, and priorities. People give to an inspiring mission and vision for the future, so convey it in visible and engaging ways.
  • Once your leadership team has compiled and assessed your findings, formulate a stewardship strategy for communicating with the congregation and individual donors using time-proven approaches outlined in all of Christopher’s and most fundraising books.

Seek always to align your congregation’s mission, message, and relationships–and the resources will flow!

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